Drinking Water and Weight Loss

Drinking Water and Weight Loss

If you’re trying to lose weight, here’s an easy way to boost your results. A scientific study shows that drinking two glasses of water before each meal will make you lose more. Researchers followed two groups of obese people aged 55 to 75 who were put on a diet. One group drank two cups of water before their meals, and the other group did not. Over a 12-week period, the water drinkers lost about 15.5 pounds, while the other group lost about 11 pounds. The researchers then followed the dieters for another year as they continued their weight-loss efforts to see if they could keep the pounds off. Here again, the water-drinking group appeared to do a little bit better. One possible explanation is that the participants replaced some calorie-laden drinks with water. In the U.S. people consume an average of 450 calories from beverages each day. The study authors also found participants felt a little more full and a little less hungry after drinking the water and that may have made them eat less. The water drinkers also felt their minds were clearer and they were thinking better. Some say that may mean they were dehydrated before starting this...
Life Expectancy and Exercise

Life Expectancy and Exercise

There’s more evidence about the benefits of exercise, especially as we age. A study out of Norway finds that older men doing three hours of exercise a week lived around five years longer than those who were sedentary. The research tracked 5700 men aged tracking 68 to 77. It found that those putting in the equivalent of six, 30-minute sessions of any intensity, were 40% less likely to have died during the 11-year study. While those who carried out vigorous exercise saw the highest benefits, even light intensity activity lowered mortality risk – However, anything less than an hour a week of light exercise had no impact. The benefits of exercise are well-known but the experts behind the study said they were taken back by just how large the impact could be, even in later life. The report detailed that even men who were 73 years of age at start of follow-up, had five years longer than the sedentary. The study concluded that the impact of this physical activity was as good as quitting smoking. The work only looked at men, but the researchers say the findings would apply equally to...
Spring Cycling

Spring Cycling

Springtime means many of us will be getting back on our bikes for exercise and transportation. It also means both cyclists and motorists must relearn how to share the road. Many drivers have fallen out of the habit of looking for cyclists at intersections and stop signs, so if you’re on two wheels, proceed with caution. Then, of course, there’s the shape of the roads at this time of year. Huge potholes and a buildup of sand, dirt and debris along the side of the road, can turn a leisurely cycle into a dangerous obstacle course. Experts suggest checking out your favourite route by car before heading out on the bike. Lots of bike paths and rural roads might still be snow- and ice-covered, so don’t assume just because your street is clear that the snow has melted everywhere. If you’re hauling your bike out of the garage for the first time, give it a quick tune-up to make sure it’s road worthy. When you do get on the bike, rein in that early season eagerness to prove you haven’t lost anything over the winter months. Limit your mileage and don’t push too high a gear. Go easy, and all you’ll feel the next morning are a few muscles you haven’t worked in a while. Go too hard and don’t be surprised if you’re seriously stiff, even if you’ve been working out all winter. Riding on the road is very different from riding indoors, so don’t be fooled into thinking that spinning can replace the real...
Black Rice

Black Rice

Here’s something to add to your list of superfoods. And for a change it’s inexpensive. A study from Louisiana State University finds black rice contains health-promoting antioxidants, similar to those found in blackberries and blueberries. As a matter of fact, the researchers say a spoonful of black rice bran contains more of these great nutrients than you’d find in a spoonful of blueberries, but with less sugar and more fiber and vitamin E antioxidants. That’s why they say black rice bran would be a unique and inexpensive way to increase people’s intake of antioxidants, and food manufacturers could use black rice bran or bran extracts to boost the health value of breakfast cereals, beverages, cakes, cookies, and other foods. The most widely produced rice worldwide is brown. Millers remove the chaff from each grain to make it brown. White rice is made when rice is milled more than is done for brown rice; the bran is also removed. That’s why the researchers figure black rice bran may be even healthier than brown. They also showed that pigments in black rice bran extracts can produce a variety of colors, from pink to black, and may be a healthier alternative to artificial food colorants that manufacturers now add to some foods and beverages. Currently, black rice is used mainly in Asia for food decoration, noodles, sushi, and...
Kybella

Kybella

It could turn out to be the next Botox. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved an injection designed specifically to get rid of unsightly double chins. The drug, called Kybella, is injected into the fat below the chin and destroys the fat cells. But authorities also warned that Kybella can also kill skin cells if inadvertently injected into the skin. And they cautioned that it is only approved for the treatment of fat occurring below the chin, and it is not known if it is safe or effective for treatment outside of this area. Kybella is a synthetic form of deoxycholic acid, a molecule that occurs naturally in the body to help destroy fat. A full course of treatment may take 6 months and patients may get up to 50 injections in a single sitting. However, right now the only alternative is surgery. The injections are not painless—the most common side effects in the clinical trials were bruising, pain, numbness and swelling. But there were also more serious problems like trouble swallowing, although it didn’t last long. It will be available commercially in the U.S. in June – no word on when that will happen...
When to Freeze

When to Freeze

This is the time of year to enjoy fresh produce whether it comes from farmers’ markets or your own garden.  But you may not realize that many fruits and vegetables lose their nutritional value quickly when they’re stored for more than a few days. Nutritionists say that’s partly because the produce was probably in transit and on shelves before you buy it. Once some fruits and vegetables hit the fridge, they can lose as much as 50 per cent of their vitamin C and other nutrients in a week, depending on the temperature. There are several ways around this. Look for produce  that’s locally grown – it’s usually travelled shorter distances and is still near its nutritional peak – and try not to stock up on more than a few days’ supply. Another option is frozen produce. While frozen fruits and vegetables may lack the flavour and aesthetic appeal of fresh, they are subjected to flash freezing immediately after being picked. That can slow or halt the loss of vitamins and nutrients. THE BOTTOM LINE: Just refrigerating produce does not prevent the loss of its...