Foodies Health

Foodies Health

Are you a foodie? It means you’re passionate about food and love trying new dishes. Many people think those of us who fit this description are indulgent and gluttonous, let along pretentious. But a study from the famous Cornell Food and Brand Lab suggests the opposite: Foodies weigh less and could be in better health than the less discerning among us. The researchers asked 500 women about their weight satisfaction, lifestyle and personality traits and provided a list of 16 novel foods and asked them to report which ones they had tried. Those who had sampled nine or more of the foods on the list were considered “foodies” in the study and the rest were classified non-adventurous eaters. The research team adjusted the data to draw on possible associations between adventurous eating, BMI and body image. Those who said they had tried things like beef tongue, Kimchi and rabbit also described themselves as more concerned with healthfulness of what they ate than did those who stuck to traditional fare. Foodies were also more physically active and their BMI’s were slightly lower than their counterparts. The study authors say these findings are important to dieters because they show that promoting adventurous eating may provide a way for people — especially women — to lose or maintain weight without feeling restricted by a strict...
Talk Therapy for Insomnia

Talk Therapy for Insomnia

It’s practically an epidemic and it can really interfere with your life! Insomnia is notoriously difficult to deal with. But after reviewing a total of 20 studies, researchers say Non-drug talk therapy can help adults who lie awake in bed most nights. They came to the conclusion that instead of taking pills, insomniacs could benefit from techniques associated with cognitive behavior therapy. The essential elements are aimed at reducing anxiety and negative thoughts about sleeplessness, as well as relaxation techniques to minimize muscle tension and mental distractions. Before the treatment, the average time to get to sleep was just under an hour. The researchers found that after engaging in the sleep-enhancing practice, people fell asleep 20 minutes sooner, on average, and slept 30 minutes more each night. Up to 15 percent of adults worldwide regularly have sleep difficulties, which can lead to anxiety, depression and even type 2 diabetes.The study is published in the Annals of Internal...
Noise and Fat

Noise and Fat

Here’s another reason to hate excessive noise. According to Swedish researchers. Exposure to noise from traffic, trains, planes and maybe even deafening restaurants could be linked to a burgeoning belly. The study in Occupational & Environmental Medicine followed 5000 people around Stockholm for four years. It found that women had a 0.08-inch increase in waist size for every additional 5 decibels in noise exposure. For men the increase was .06 inches. And the risk of a larger waist rose with the number of sources of noise someone was exposed to at the same time. The scientists speculate that long-term exposure to noise, especially from traffic may affect our metabolism and lead to abdominal obesity. That’s because noise is stressful, and stress can alter levels of hormones which influence where in the body excess calories are deposited. Earlier research has shown associations between traffic noise and high blood pressure and heart attacks. They conclude that since abdominal obesity is a risk factor for many diseases, including heart disease and diabetes   noise should be recognized a serious threat to public...
Calcium Supplements and Heart Risk

Calcium Supplements and Heart Risk

You may want to think twice about taking calcium supplements to boost bone health. Millions of people do. But now New Zealand researchers say the supplements can endanger cardiac health in older people and have little effect on bone strength. They analyzed 11 controlled trials involving 12,000 patients, and concluded that supplements raised the heart attack risk by 30 per cent in older women. The researchers say that increased risk is enough to completely counterbalance the small beneficial effect that calcium tablets have on numbers of fractures. Rather than relying on calcium supplements, they suggest people get their required calcium from food. At the very least, they say you should talk to your doctor before continuing with additional calcium. The report is published in the British Medical Journal. An editorial accompanying it said more research will be needed to determine if the heart attack risk is real. Also, this analysis did not look at what happens when calcium is taken with vitamin D – a popular...
Surgery Safety and Doctor Fatigue

Surgery Safety and Doctor Fatigue

It’s something I worried about every time I had surgery. What if the doctor was on call the night before and was fatigued by the time I had my operation? Now research that followed the outcomes in nearly 39,000 cases here in Ontario found that patients having elective surgery during the day fare no better or worse if the doctor operating has worked the night before. The work tracked similar patients who had the same procedure conducted by the same physician, with and without a night off to rest. It found the risk of adverse outcomes from the daytime surgery was similar, even if the doctor had treated patients between midnight and 7 a.m. the night before. The study in the New England Journal of Medicine is the latest chapter in a long debate about the effect of round-the-clock shifts on patient safety. Nancy Baxter, the chief of general surgery at St. Michael’s Hospital and a senior researcher on the study, said the findings show that physicians are finding ways – either through scheduling or monitoring their performance – to respond to the need for emergency care without negatively affecting patients. Critics say the study is flawed because it only shows whether the doctors worked the night before and not whether they managed to get some...
Drinking Water and Weight Loss

Drinking Water and Weight Loss

If you’re trying to lose weight, here’s an easy way to boost your results. A scientific study shows that drinking two glasses of water before each meal will make you lose more. Researchers followed two groups of obese people aged 55 to 75 who were put on a diet. One group drank two cups of water before their meals, and the other group did not. Over a 12-week period, the water drinkers lost about 15.5 pounds, while the other group lost about 11 pounds. The researchers then followed the dieters for another year as they continued their weight-loss efforts to see if they could keep the pounds off. Here again, the water-drinking group appeared to do a little bit better. One possible explanation is that the participants replaced some calorie-laden drinks with water. In the U.S. people consume an average of 450 calories from beverages each day. The study authors also found participants felt a little more full and a little less hungry after drinking the water and that may have made them eat less. The water drinkers also felt their minds were clearer and they were thinking better. Some say that may mean they were dehydrated before starting this...